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Angels coach breaks leg catching opening pitch

Angels coach breaks leg catching opening pitch

BREAK A LEG:Don Baylor, who is a former player and is in his first season as part of the coaching staff for the Angels baseball team, was in a crouched position when he took the throw from Guerrero. Photo: Associated Press

(Reuters) – Los Angeles Angels hitting coach Don Baylor broke a bone in his right leg while attempting to catch the ceremonial first pitch thrown by former Los Angeles star Vladimir Guerrero, and will undergo surgery on Tuesday, the team said.

Baylor, who is a former player and is in his first season as part of the coaching staff for the Angels baseball team, was in a crouched position when he took the throw from Guerrero.

As he moved to catch the ball, 64-year-old Baylor shifted his weight onto his right leg and snapped the bone. Video of the accident showed Baylor’s right leg twisting under him unnaturally. He had to be assisted by Angels trainers off the field and was taken to a hospital, the team said in a statement.

PHOTOS: 2014 Opening Day

The Angels lost to the Seattle Mariners 10-3.

(Reporting By Carey Gillam in Kansa City; Editing by Susan Fenton)

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