Ashton Kutcher, Mariska Hargitay dominate TV paychecks

Ashton Kutcher, Mariska Hargitay dominate TV paychecks

BIG BANK: Longtime "Law and Order: SVU" star Mariska Hargitay brings home a healthy paycheck for her role on the NBC crime drama. Photo: Associated Press

Ashton Kutcher, Mariska Hargitay, Howard Stern, and Ellen DeGeneres have been crowned the kings and queens of U.S. TV in a new magazine rich list.

Father-to-be Kutcher earns $100,000-per-episode more than his “Two and a Half Men” co-star Jon Cryer to top the TV comedy earners list with $750,000-per-show, while “Law & Order: SVU” star Hargitay leads “The Mentalist’s” Simon Baker in the drama department, with a $400,000-per-episode salary.

“America’s Got Talent” judge Stern ties with “American Idol” host Ryan Seacrest as the top earning reality TV star with a $15 million-per-season haul, and DeGeneres remains the queen of daytime television on the annual TV Guide Who Earns What countdown with up to $20 million-a-year for her daily talk show.

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