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Frank Stallone checks into rehab

Frank Stallone checks into rehab

CHECKED INTO REHAB:Frank Stallone. Photo: Associated Press

Sylvester Stallone’s younger brother Frank has checked into rehab in a bid to conquer his battle with alcohol.

The singer and actor turned to professionals at the Betty Ford Center in California over the weekend.

Frank Stallone’s manager, Randi Siegel, tells People.com, “With the support of his friends and family, Frank is taking a much needed break from his professional activities to regroup and focus on his health and well-being.

“This opportunity will enable him to move forward in his career from a solid foundation.”

Sylvester has given his 63-year-old sibling his backing for seeking treatment.

A representative for “The Expendables” star says, “Sylvester Stallone supports his brother’s decision and this process.”

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