News

‘Gluten-free’ labeling standards kick in

‘Gluten-free’ labeling standards kick in

GLUTEN FREE: Starting this week, "gluten free" labels on packaged foods have real meaning. Until now, the term "gluten free" had not been regulated, and manufacturers made their own decisions about what it means. Photo: Associated Press/Jon Elswick

MARY CLARE JALONICK, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — Starting this week, “gluten-free” labels on packaged foods have real meaning.

Until now, the term “gluten-free” had not been regulated, and manufacturers made their own decisions about what it means.

This new requirement is especially important for people who suffer from celiac disease and don’t absorb nutrients well. They can get sick from the gluten found in wheat and other cereal grains.

Food manufacturers faced a Tuesday deadline to ensure that anything labeled gluten-free contains less than 20 parts per million of gluten — ensuring that those products are technically free of wheat, rye and barley.

That amount is generally recognized by the medical community to be low enough so that most people who have celiac disease won’t get sick if they eat it.

Recent Headlines

in Entertainment

We’re going to keep on ‘Keeping Up’ with Kardashians

kimkardashian

Reality TV's most famous family is sticking around for four more years.

in Viral Videos

What it would sound like if Ice T voiced cartoons

14-overlay5

"Scooby Doo" and "Dora the Explorer" would sound a whole lot different.

in Viral Videos

2-year-old sings National Anthem, makes America better

12-overlay7

Adorable Trent Harris singing the "Star Spangled Banner" before the start of a high school basketball game will make you proud to be an American.

in Entertainment, Weird

Forget the Double-Down, KFC launches edible coffee cups

kfccup

Kentucky Fried Chicken is testing edible coffee cups in some of its stores. Maybe next they'll try edible chicken.

in Entertainment

Drew Barrymore plans tell-all book of essays

barrymore

The "Charlie's Angels" star will lift the lid on the details of her wild youth and Hollywood career.