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In San Fran, a million won’t buy you much

In San Fran, a million won’t buy you much

COST OF LIVING: George Limperis, a Realtor with Paragon Real Estate Group, smiles while walking through the kitchen of a property in the Noe Valley neighborhood in San Francisco, Wednesday, July 30. The median selling price for homes and condominiums hit seven figures for the first time last month. Photo: Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A research firm says a record number of million-dollar homes were sold in the San Francisco Bay Area during the second quarter, another sign that affording a place to live is a growing challenge for anyone who isn’t tied to the technology economy.

CoreLogic DataQuick said that more than 5,700 homes sold for at least $1 million from April through June, the highest since the Irvine, California-based firm began collecting data in 1988.

More than 1,100 homes sold for at least $2 million in the nine-county region, also a record.

Santa Clara County, in the heart of Silicon Valley, and the city of San Francisco set records for million-dollar sales.

Prices are highest in San Francisco, where the median sales price hit $1 million last month.

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